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Mayflies - Imitating Aquatic Insects

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Mayflies - Imitating Aquatic Insects
$29.95

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By varying the color of the materials used & the hook sizes, these 14 basic patterns cover ever mayfly that trout feed on in the United States in all the stages of life that trout are involved with. 90 min.
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By varying the color of the materials used & the hook sizes, these 14 basic patterns cover ever mayfly that trout feed on in the United States in all the stages of life that trout are involved with. 90 min. More Information: The idea is simple. Determine what the trout are eating, match that with an artificial replica and proceed to catch them. Although doing so can range from being easy, to next too impossible, in some angler’s minds, the challenge of accomplishing this is the most enjoyable and satisfying part of the sport. This series of programs was written and produced to assist anglers in meeting this challenge. The objective is to assist you in identifying which aquatic insects the trout are feeding on, selecting an imitation that matches it and presenting the imitation in such a manner as to fool the trout into thinking it is the real thing. By far the most imitated specie of aquatic insect is the mayfly. You will see the order “Ephemeroptera” a big word meaning, “short-lived winged insect”- (ephemero-meaning short lived) and (ptera-meaning winged). In the United States there are several hundred specie of them. When mayflies are hatching and trout are rising, it is a fly fishers dream that came true. Day in and day out, however, this is not the case. To begin with, in the U. S., with few exceptions, mayflies only hatch between the months of March and November and this long period of time occurs only in the southernmost areas of the U.S. where trout waters exist. On most streams, the majority of the hatches occur during the months of May, June and July. When hatches do occur, many of them only last for a short period of time, a few days or less in many cases. During the hatch mayfly duns may emerge for only an hour or two and not return to the water as a spinner until dark or even well into the night in some cases. So all things considered, on any given stream or lake, trout are only feeding on hatching mayfly duns or spinners a very small percentage of time. When they do, you want to be ready for them.
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